Joseph Wept

Sarah Craven, a graduate of Union Seminary, a world traveler, and a dear sister loved by all her brothers and sisters in the Lord, tells a very moving story of Joseph and his reconciliation with his brothers who betrayed him. She showed a the closing scene from the movie, Warrior, an emotional moment showing two brothers, who have been estranged for 14 years, being reconciled with each other during a mixed martial arts contest. The video clip is available on youtube.com at this link (click here to see movie clip). (Since there is very little dialog in the movie clip, the scene is not included in this sermon recording.) Here are scriptures used by Sarah, all from The Message.

Genesis 42:21-22

Then they started talking among themselves. “Now we’re paying for what we did to our brother—we saw how terrified he was when he was begging us for mercy. We wouldn’t listen to him and now we’re the ones in trouble.”  Reuben broke in. “Didn’t I tell you, ‘Don’t hurt the boy’? But no, you wouldn’t listen. And now we’re paying for his murder.”

Genesis 44:18-34

Judah came forward. He said, “Please, master; can I say just one thing to you? Don’t get angry. Don’t think I’m presumptuous—you’re the same as Pharaoh as far as I’m concerned. You, master, asked us, ‘Do you have a father and a brother?’ And we answered honestly, ‘We have a father who is old and a younger brother who was born to him in his old age. His brother is dead and he is the only son left from that mother. And his father loves him more than anything.’

“Then you told us, ‘Bring him down here so I can see him.’ We told you, master, that it was impossible: ‘The boy can’t leave his father; if he leaves, his father will die.’

“And then you said, ‘If your youngest brother doesn’t come with you, you won’t be allowed to see me.’

“When we returned to our father, we told him everything you said to us. So when our father said, ‘Go back and buy some more food,’ we told him flatly, ‘We can’t. The only way we can go back is if our youngest brother is with us. We aren’t allowed to even see the man if our youngest brother doesn’t come with us.’

“Your servant, my father, told us, ‘You know very well that my wife gave me two sons. One turned up missing. I concluded that he’d been ripped to pieces. I’ve never seen him since. If you now go and take this one and something bad happens to him, you’ll put my old gray, grieving head in the grave for sure.’

“And now, can’t you see that if I show up before your servant, my father, without the boy, this son with whom his life is so bound up, the moment he realizes the boy is gone, he’ll die on the spot. He’ll die of grief and we, your servants who are standing here before you, will have killed him. And that’s not all. I got my father to release the boy to show him to you by promising, ‘If I don’t bring him back, I’ll stand condemned before you, Father, all my life.’

“So let me stay here as your slave, not this boy. Let the boy go back with his brothers. How can I go back to my father if the boy is not with me? Oh, don’t make me go back and watch my father die in grief!”

Psalms 126:1-6

It seemed like a dream, too good to be true,     when God returned Zion’s exiles. We laughed, we sang,     we couldn’t believe our good fortune. We were the talk of the nations—     “God was wonderful to them!” God was wonderful to us;     we are one happy people.

And now, God, do it again—     bring rains to our drought-stricken lives So those who planted their crops in despair     will shout hurrahs at the harvest, So those who went off with heavy hearts     will come home laughing, with armloads of blessing.

Genesis 45:9-11

“Hurry back to my father. Tell him, ‘Your son Joseph says: I’m master of all of Egypt. Come as fast as you can and join me here. I’ll give you a place to live in Goshen where you’ll be close to me—you, your children, your grandchildren, your flocks, your herds, and anything else you can think of. I’ll take care of you there completely. There are still five more years of famine ahead; I’ll make sure all your needs are taken care of, you and everyone connected with you—you won’t want for a thing.’